Understanding pointers in c book

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Media, Inc. Understanding and Using C Pointers, the image of a piping crow, . of C. If you are a more experienced C or C++ programmer, this book will help. Improve your programming through a solid understanding of C pointers and memory management. With this practical book, you'll learn how pointers provide the. download Understanding and Using C Pointers 1 by Richard M. Reese (ISBN: ) from site's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on.

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Understanding Pointers In C Book

maroc-evasion.info - download Understanding Pointers in C book online at best prices in India on maroc-evasion.info Read Understanding Pointers in C book reviews & author details. He needs command over pointers to be able to exploit their immense potential. Pointers are all about power and punch and this book covers everything that has . Improve your programming through a solid understanding of C pointers and memory management. With this practical book, you'll learn how.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Improve your programming through a solid understanding of C pointers and memory management. Author Richard Reese shows you how to use pointers with arrays, strings, structures, and functions, using m Improve your programming through a solid understanding of C pointers and memory management. Author Richard Reese shows you how to use pointers with arrays, strings, structures, and functions, using memory models throughout the book. Difficult to master, pointers provide C with much flexibility and power—yet few resources are dedicated to this data type.

Get an introduction to pointers, including the declaration of different pointer types Learn about dynamic memory allocation, de-allocation, and alternative memory management techniques Use techniques for passing or returning data to and from functions Understand the fundamental aspects of arrays as they relate to pointers Explore the basics of strings and how pointers are used to support them Examine why pointers can be the source of security problems, such as buffer overflow Learn several pointer techniques, such as the use of opaque pointers, bounded pointers and, the restrict keyword Get A Copy.

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Understanding and Using C Pointers

More Details Other Editions 6. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Understanding and Using C Pointers , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Understanding and Using C Pointers. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details.

More filters. Sort order. Reese has managed to explain in such a straightforward way, something that has been so difficult for authors and professors to explain for ages. I found myself repeatedly saying "why didn't the textbook just say that?! Everyone made them sound like they'd be the toughest thing in the world, the reality is obviously much different.

Despite it's thin size, and that I really have no need for pointers in my current job. If I ever were to need to brush up on pointers again, I would be going straight to this one. Sep 20, Andrew Obrigewitsch rated it it was amazing Shelves: If you ever found yourself having trouble understanding pointers, and who doesn't? Then this book is for you. It explains pointer in a more clear and concise way than any other thing I've ever seen before.

However this is not a beginning C book, you need to have a good idea of how to program in C first. Apr 22, Dustin rated it it was amazing. Excellent read. For someone who hasn't dealt much with pointers, this book brought me up to speed for all my Arduino work with pointer passing, string concatenations and such.

This book will make a great reference for future work as well. Oct 04, JManInPhoenix rated it really liked it. I ran many of Mr.

Reese's code snippets with printf statements liberally sprinkled throughout. The control follows a stack principle, but no arguments are passed. GOSUB routines are a way to factor out common code, but that common code has to work on global variables. Now, consider the case of simple electronic devices.

Even today some embedded devices, usually programmed using C, do not have a call stack that dynamically allocates space for automatic variables. The only stack you have is for return addresses and it is probably handled in hardware. Life is great. This is the mindset I think Traister had and never got past. In the book there is one fleeting mention of the stack in reference to excessive automatic memory allocation. His writing about pointers suggests that he thinks, for each function, space is set aside to hold the local variables for the duration of the program, but you can only access them when inside the function in which they were declared.

So pointers are really powerful because you can provide this address to another function and it can change the value using only a parameter. Further evidence for his lack of understanding is that he frequently cites ridiculous space micro-optimizations within functions, such as avoiding the use of integers for index variables, if possible.

Another one, mentioned often, is local char arrays that have a fixed size.

best book for learn pointers in C ??

There are good reasons to not use them but his are not among them. His admonishment is that they waste space. Technically, that is true, but they don't exist until they're on the stack. And he never talks about global or file variables.

This interpretation runs into some problems once you start asking how functions with malloc will work, but it's worth pointing out that there is almost no discussion about memory management.

In a book devoted to C pointers, that's a toxic mix of gross negligence and incompetence. He does this by passing an arbitrary number of arguments to a function the first being the number of arguments and accessing them using offsets from the address of the first argument.

Honestly, this is the most generous interpretation of the text I could come up with, and it still paints a terrible picture.

Occam's Razor suggests that Traister is just clueless. Given the ineptness of the book, you'd think it was self-published.

GOSUB routines are a way to factor out common code, but that common code has to work on global variables. Now, consider the case of simple electronic devices. Even today some embedded devices, usually programmed using C, do not have a call stack that dynamically allocates space for automatic variables.

The only stack you have is for return addresses and it is probably handled in hardware.

You read about pointers and realize something: Life is great. This is the mindset I think Traister had and never got past. In the book there is one fleeting mention of the stack in reference to excessive automatic memory allocation. His writing about pointers suggests that he thinks, for each function, space is set aside to hold the local variables for the duration of the program, but you can only access them when inside the function in which they were declared.

So pointers are really powerful because you can provide this address to another function and it can change the value using only a parameter. Further evidence for his lack of understanding is that he frequently cites ridiculous space micro-optimizations within functions, such as avoiding the use of integers for index variables, if possible. Another one, mentioned often, is local char arrays that have a fixed size.

There are good reasons to not use them but his are not among them. His admonishment is that they waste space. Technically, that is true, but they don't exist until they're on the stack. And he never talks about global or file variables.

This interpretation runs into some problems once you start asking how functions with malloc will work, but it's worth pointing out that there is almost no discussion about memory management.

In a book devoted to C pointers, that's a toxic mix of gross negligence and incompetence. He does this by passing an arbitrary number of arguments to a function the first being the number of arguments and accessing them using offsets from the address of the first argument. Honestly, this is the most generous interpretation of the text I could come up with, and it still paints a terrible picture.

Occam's Razor suggests that Traister is just clueless. Given the ineptness of the book, you'd think it was self-published. You would be wrong. That programmer was right, but the publisher went ahead and published it anyway. Since there was a second edition, the assumption is that the book sold well.

computer science - What's a nice explanation for pointers? - Software Engineering Stack Exchange

The lack of material in this area at the time is probably why it sold. I could not track down a review of this book anywhere and yes, I looked through scans of Byte Magazine et al.

In other words, like many books—and tech books in particular—it sold because of its title and good timing. The breadth of topics covered in his works seems exhausting:

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