The science of good cooking pdf

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The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to and millions of other books are available for site Kindle. Unlock a lifetime of successful cooking with this groundbreaking new volume from the editors of Cook's Illustrated, the magazine that put food science on the. Fifty unique experiments from the test kitchen bring food science to life, and more than landmark Cook's Illustrated recipes illustrate each basic principle. PDF-The Science of Good Cooking (Cook's Illustrated Cookbooks) by The Editors of America's Test Kitchen and Guy Crosby.

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The Science Of Good Cooking Pdf

Nov 19, NPR coverage of The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen by Cook's Illustrated. Online PDF The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen (Cook s Illustrated Cookbooks), Read PDF. Feb 1, Such an interview was on Lab Out Loud with food chemistry expert Guy Crosby, Ph.D., about his book The Science of Good Cooking. The book.

I've talked recently about my favorite science podcasts. I listen to them frequently for, amongst other things, the witty banter and the interesting interviews. It has done pretty well for itself, as it rightfully deserves in my opinion. The hefty tome contains recipes in over pages, each recipe tweaked to perfection in America's Test Kitchen. In fact, the recipes are perfect to a fault. There are recipes in there literally asking for degree butter. I used to enjoy complicated recipes that call for degree butter, back when I had no kids and unlimited time. But now that I have a toddler, I thank my lucky stars when I have all the correct ingredients on hand. Most of the time I improvise, swapping yogurt for sour cream because that's all I have and hey, dairy is dairy so close enough, right? I'm also going to admit I take whatever shortcuts necessary to obtain the fewest amount of dishes. But was I going to let one toddler stop me from trying one of these perfected recipes? Of course not! I shipped the toddler off to her grandparents on a Saturday morning and started baking. For science! As you can tell from the photograph at the top of the post, even with all my toddler-free time I couldn't hold my wits together long enough to remember to download chocolate chips.

For a long time, I avoided it as much as possible to protect my home from fires and my loved ones from gastrointestinal distress. My husband did most of the cooking and once in a while I contributed by either cooking something from my mom's Cream of Comfort recipes or, better, ordering take-out. But something about these Test Kitchen recipes They seemed doable.

Book Review: The Science of Good Cooking

I did not have experience in the kitchen, but I was good at following instructions. I also loved that the recipes were optimized. I had occasionally attempted new recipes I found on the internet, but the results there were highly variable.

With the Test Kitchen, the recipes had gone through taste testing by people that knew good food. For me, this seemed like a suitable replacement for the generations of optimizing that happen as great family recipes are passed down.

I've had people argue with me over this last point, usually people that DO have a culinary starting point, like a grandmother's spaghetti sauce recipe. When I ask these people about their specific recipes, however, they say, "Oh, I add a little of this and a little of that -- it is a little different every time.

PDF The Science of Good Cooking (Cook s Illustrated Cookbooks) {Free Books|Online

The scientist in me wants some amount of reproducibility of results. Also, without intuition, "a little of this and that" doesn't really help me. Nice going, brain. I substituted white chocolate chips for semisweet chocolate chips because that's what I already had, and hoped for the best.

My favorite part is that the books explains why the cookies were amazing, each recipe has a "Why This Recipe Works" section.

For example, in the chocolate chip cookie recipe, that section explains why the ratio of white to brown sugar can affect the chewiness, why browning the butter adds a huge amount of flavor, and why the recipe instructs to whisk the warm butter and sugar then letting it sit 10 minutes. The answer to that last one, if you're wondering, is because "by allowing the sugar to rest in the liquids, more of it dissolves in the small amount of moisture before baking. The dissolved sugar caramelizes more easily and helps to create a cookie with crisps edges and a chewy center.

That is exactly why I will use the book so much, though I will probably rarely find the time to use its perfect recipes. Because it is more than a collection of recipes, it's a primer. The recipes are lumped into 50 concepts aiming to teach the core principles of cooking.

The Science Of Good Cooking

I just keep picking up the book when I get a free moment, learning a little bit more about cooking every time. Like many others I learned cooking from watching my parents in the kitchen, I'm finding it incredibly refreshing to find out why some things work the way they do.

As a child I would avoid them all together. As I've gotten older, I've learned to tolerate them more. I had the habit of chopping onions into tiny bits — tiny enough that they wouldn't perceptible — and it turns out that was the wrong thing to do entirely! You see, the pungent onion flavor happens when the cell walls are ruptured, causing the enzymes in the cell walls to react with the sulfure-containing amino acids inside the cell.

The Science Of Good Cooking : NPR

But something about these Test Kitchen recipes They seemed doable. I did not have experience in the kitchen, but I was good at following instructions.

I also loved that the recipes were optimized. I had occasionally attempted new recipes I found on the internet, but the results there were highly variable. With the Test Kitchen, the recipes had gone through taste testing by people that knew good food. For me, this seemed like a suitable replacement for the generations of optimizing that happen as great family recipes are passed down.

I've had people argue with me over this last point, usually people that DO have a culinary starting point, like a grandmother's spaghetti sauce recipe. When I ask these people about their specific recipes, however, they say, "Oh, I add a little of this and a little of that -- it is a little different every time.

The scientist in me wants some amount of reproducibility of results. Also, without intuition, "a little of this and that" doesn't really help me. My culinary starting point was something like, "Jarred spaghetti sauce tastes better than canned spaghetti sauce.

When I started this process, I routinely overcooked scrambled eggs.

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