Darkside tom stoppard pdf

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PDF | The article centres on the notion of responsibility in Tom Stoppard's Darkside (). While Pink Floyd's original album, which inspired the playwright . AVANT, Vol. VIII, No. 2/ ISSN: maroc-evasion.info DOI: / Hauntology of Responsibility: Tom Stoppard's Darkside. Tom Stoppard. Incorporating The Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd. Directed by. Peter Garino. A Benefit for The Shakespeare Project of.

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Darkside Tom Stoppard Pdf

DARKSIDE. Tom Stoppard. BBC Radio 2. August 26, MP3 Version. Rufus Sewell, Iwan Rheon, Sir Tom Stoppard, Amaka Okafor and Bill Nighy. Thanks to. Darkside:: A Play By Tom Stoppard Incorporating The Dark Side Of The Moon by Pink Floyd. Darkside is a philosophical comedy radio drama written by Tom Stoppard, produced and . Create a book · Download as PDF · Printable version.

His mastery shows how much modernist aesthetics is still around us. His radio play explores ethical concerns regarding humanity, including the environmental concerns we are facing today. Stoppard shows mastery on the western philosophical discussion on ethics Aristotle, Kant, Rousseau, Nietzsche, et al while incorporates references not only from the entire Pink Floyd catalogue but through the cultural o Tom Stoppard's Darkside is more than a play inspired on Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon. Stoppard shows mastery on the western philosophical discussion on ethics Aristotle, Kant, Rousseau, Nietzsche, et al while incorporates references not only from the entire Pink Floyd catalogue but through the cultural overlapping references, such as The Wizard of Oz. Yes, you got that right. A BBC radio play from summer that progresses through the classic album asking the question - what's it all about? What is 'the good? On the radio.

Levinas, , p. The example is insolent and disruptive in regard to the authority of the notion. All these tiny narratives discuss the notion of responsibility—e. In the same way, they perform an unruly task towards the purpose of illustrating the seemingly insoluble and universal nature of an ethical problem because they are saturated with context, meaning and actual characters with whom Emily interacts. As an alternative to taking the stories at their face value, as it were, Emily probes the consequences of a given narrative and reveals their singularity.

This leads her to recognise the abstract, detached-from-life status of the prob- lems she is to solve: What these responses have in common is their relationship with the notion of responsibility, which, as Jacques Derrida shows, involves a connection with responding to the other, for example.

Interestingly, this allows for a dis- cussion from a hauntological and undecidable perspective: More serious still, it must always run the risk of conversion and apostasy: Derrida, , p. The human condition is thus one where ethics is a continual sacrifice; a continuous moment of decision-making between our loved ones and our professional duties or individual and general responsibil- ities. Anderson, It may well be that this haunting remainder is related to the aspect which is frequently overlooked in the ethical and moral dilemmas, namely emotions.

Or a mad bomber on a date with destiny? These serve to expose the abstract and, in a way, inhumane nature of the ethical exemplary narratives. The positive response to the record falls onto a time identified by Eva Illouz in her Cold Intimacies as the period when the economic and the emotional domains of human life overlap.

As she observes, modern individualism has not only become emo- tional but even dominated by economy. In turn, the economic and the political models of exchange have become models for emotional relationships, infiltrating the relationships between people, even the intimate ones. Illouz, , p. Part of this stems from the fact, recognised by Derrida, which makes us see moral choices as undecidable transgressions against our responsibilities to others.

Whiteley, but also to such recurrent understanding of responsibility. My initial aim was to look at the two texts from a hauntological perspective at the way they discuss the notion of responsibility.

In fact, following the vexed nature of the notion of responsibility—read as a certain ethical obliga- tion—Darkside speaks about the deconstructive consequences of using example-stories which reveal the paradoxical status of ethics.

Putting responsibility, as Derrida does, in the context of a subversive aporia, may lead to viewing it as an undecidable which is transgres- sive towards authority or tradition of an explanatory discourse.

Through their structure of exemplarity, however, examples—and literature in general—can connote a threat to the integrity of philosophical discourses. The individualism of contemporary life, together with the decision making process it involves, produces ethical spectres which haunt people and force them to reconsider the responsibility for their actions.

References Anderson, N. Deconstruction and ethics: An ir responsibility. Colebrook Ed. Key concepts pp. London, UK: Critchley, S.

The ethics of deconstruction: Derrida and Levinas 2nd ed. Edinburgh, UK: Culler, J. Literary theory: A very short introduction. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Davis, C. After poststructuralism: Reading, stories and theory. Derrida, J. The gift of death. Willis, Trans.

Track Listings

Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press. Eaglestone, R. Ethical criticism: Reading after Levinas. Edinburgh University Press. Gothic music: The sounds of the uncanny. Cardiff, UK: University of Wales Press.

Harpham, G. McLaughlin Eds. University of Chicago Press.

Darkside (radio play) - Wikipedia

Illouz, E. Cold intimacies: The making of emotional capitalism. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Lectures et discours talmudiques. Paris, France: Pink Floyd. Dark Side of the Moon [CD]. Capitol Records. Original record Ricoeur, P.

The concept of responsibility: An essay in semantic analysis. Ricoeur, The just pp. Recorded voices, laughter, sounds of heartbeat which open and close the album —all such effects trouble the listener and challenge the very percep- tion of what otherwise might simply be popular music. Responsibility, indeed, also seems to be a hauntologically hazy phenomenon. If we then consider responsibility as a state of being accountable for some action or event, such understanding of the notion can easily be identified at various levels of both texts the record and the play.

Tom Stoppard + Dark Side of the Moon = Holy God...

Both of them—in more than simply formal sense—seem influenced by the spectral quality of an ethical obligation: both rely on aural signification which seems to thematize the notion of responsibility either as small-scale embedded narratives, dialogues, or lyrics and real-life noises, fading in and out of the soundscape in a spectral way. Ethical terms seem thus to underlie much of the material not only in its content but in some cases in the very way in which the musicians were working on the album.

Famous are the stories how during the recording sessions Waters recruited the staff, the temporary occupants of the studio and roadies to answer a series of questions printed on flashcards. These were ranging from general questions about a favourite colour to more specific ones, for example about the last time they were violent. The recorded an- swers were later on included in the final album.

I was in the right! Yes, absolutely in the right! I certainly was in the right! You was definitely in the right. That geezer was cruising for a bruising! Why does anyone do anything? I don't know, I was really drunk at the time! I was just telling him, he couldn't get into number 2. He was asking why he wasn't coming up on freely, after I was yelling and screaming and telling him why he wasn't coming up on freely.

It came as a heavy blow, but we sorted the matter out. Interestingly, it functions within an ethical perspective and seems to haunt the person while at the same time indicating a cer- tain spectral quality of responsibility.

According to Sheila Whiteley: The words act like dialogue over the music, impressionistic yet making a point. As the album deals with stress, lunacy and death in contemporary society, so the disembodied vocal tim- bres create effective commentary: cynical asides and taped effects underline the inhuman quality still further by creating an abstract collage against which to project the emptiness of modern life; while the electronic treatment of instrumental and vocal sounds helps to rein- force the distancing of space as signified through pure tone, electronically synthesized.

Whiteley, , p. It is a story of Emily McCoy, a student of philosophy and a patient in an institution resembling an insane asylum run by Dr Antrobus who is administering her treatment.

Darkside: Tom Stoppard’s play was as pretentious as Pink Floyd’s music, review

In the course of the play Emily interacts in various ways with such characters. Curi- ously enough Emily has substantial doubts about the whole narrative and asks follow-up questions about the details of the characters of the story: Who was on the train?

Who was the boy who got hit by the train? Stoppard, , p. This seems to dislodge the moral dilemmas from their usual functions within ethics as a discourse. Moreover, such narrative techniques which introduce an ethical problem only to propose a non-standard resolution e.

In the play, ethics as a philosophical discourse on morality is reflected as a paradox. When she meets a Boy from one of the thought experiments her doubts about ever obtaining an answer or reaching some transcendental point of certainty become sealed. Their role, however, is certainly deconstructive as they act out the consequences of the example-stories only to dislodge the ethical discourse from its explanatory position. Instead, what they focus on is just telling more stories.

Such tradition of reluctance and reservation towards examples often in the narrative form can be evidenced with the work of philosophers representing disparate traditions of un- derstanding ethics.

One such case, concerning telling lies and an obligation to tell the truth, comes from Immanuel Kant. While illustrating how, despite being a violation of the cate- gorical imperative, in some situations one has to tell a benevolent lie in order to save others e.

Davis, , pp. Interestingly, a similar reluctance to- wards the use of narratives as examples can be found in the works of a philosopher repre- senting a somewhat different approach to ethics and responsibility, namely Emmanuel Levinas. In the case of his works, the trouble with examples, and more widely with liter- ature, stems from seeing narratives as embodying what might be termed as the structure of exemplarity. Hamlet, for instance, presents itself as in some way exemplary.

Culler, , p. The vexed nature of this relationship is visible in the sparse use of such exemplary stories in as disparate strands of ethics as the ones exemplified by Kant or Levinas.

What is interesting is that in both cases stories, narratives and literature in general connote a certain threat or something poten- tially dangerous to the coherence and integrity of what the philosophers are discussing. Levinas, , p. The example is insolent and disruptive in regard to the authority of the notion. All these tiny narratives discuss the notion of responsibility—e. In the same way, they perform an unruly task towards the purpose of illustrating the seemingly insoluble and universal nature of an ethical problem because they are saturated with context, meaning and actual characters with whom Emily interacts.

As an alternative to taking the stories at their face value, as it were, Emily probes the consequences of a given narrative and reveals their singularity. What these responses have in common is their relationship with the notion of responsibility, which, as Jacques Derrida shows, involves a connection with responding to the other, for example. More serious still, it must always run the risk of conversion and apostasy: there is no responsibility without a dissident and inventive rupture with respect to tradition, authority, orthodoxy, rule, or doctrine.

Derrida, , p. The human condition is thus one where ethics is a continual sacrifice; a continuous moment of decision-making between our loved ones and our professional duties or individual and general responsibil- ities. Anderson, It may well be that this haunting remainder is related to the aspect which is frequently overlooked in the ethical and moral dilemmas, namely emotions.

Or a mad bomber on a date with destiny?

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