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How the Best Managers Use Recognition to Engage Their People, Retain Talent, and Accelerate Performance. by Adrian Gostick, Chester Elton. The Carrot Principle reveals the groundbreaking results of one of the most in-depth management studies ever undertaken, showing definitively. Find out more about The Carrot Principle by Adrian Gostick, Chester Elton at Simon & Schuster. Read book reviews & excerpts, watch author videos & more. Editorial Reviews. maroc-evasion.info Review. Book Description Got carrotphobia? Do you think that Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Business & Money.

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The Carrot Principle Ebook

Editorial Reviews. Review. “The undisputed thought leaders in employee motivation. Advanced Search · Kindle Store; ›; Kindle eBooks; ›; Business & Money. (ebook) Summary: The Carrot Principle from Dymocks online store. The must- read summary of Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton's. The Carrot Principle book. Read 85 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The Carrot Principle: How the Best Managers Use Recognition to.

About The Book Newly updated to include information for the UK, The Carrot Principle illustrates how ordinary organizations have made themselves extraordinary through the use of strategic employee recognition. The authors show how great organizations and great managers succeed through living the Carrot Principle. Featuring case studies of effective recognition in some of the world's most successful organizations, such as DHL, Avis, Pepsi, etc and demonstrating how recognition has led to improved employee commitment and bottom line results in these companies, the book also shows how a Carrot Culture is not created by the CEO, senior leadership team or HR department, but manager by manager. The book provides examples of leaders - from around the globe - who lead through the Carrot Principle: providing plentiful how-to's for managers wishing to get started or hoping to enhance their recognition abilities. Overall, there has never been a book in the recognition or motivation space that has had this type of quantitative or case study support.

After all, it's rarely the large things that differentiate us in our customers' minds from the competition; it's the little things employees do that make all the difference. Thank-you recognition is the most frequent type offered by effective managers.

It is given to an employee who meets but not necessarily exceeds performance expectations. It is day-to-day encouragement for the person who is a consistent and steady performer, who always gets the report in on time, who is always courteous when making a deliver to a customer's home or business, who always has a positive attitude, who is the consummate team player, who gave an admirable try but didn't quite make it, and so on.

This could include the presentation of a personalized award, dinner for two, tickets to a ball game or symphony, a selection from a catalogue of merchandise, or anything else you can dream up. Employees are eligible for these awards if they consistently demonstrate your values by taking on challenging customer issues, work late weeks in a row, develop sophisticated changes to improve important processes, demonstrate outstanding leadership, improve the way you pitch prospective clients, mentor a new employee to productivity, provide exceptional customer care, and so on.

If you know that at 5: These may be one-time or ongoing achievements and are the highest level of above-and-beyond awards. These rewards recognize an employee who has clearly influenced your financial statement, perhaps by developing a new system that saves money, being granted a patent, winning an important industry award, breaking a performance record, landing a new account, introducing a new process to significantly improve efficiency, achieving a top sales goal, being part of a team that came together with the innovative pitch that won a big deal, or working from a customer service position to keep a big client in the fold.

The level of award will depend on the impact. If the idea saves millions of dollars, they the sky is the limit when it comes to how much you will spend to recognize this person or team. Neglect to present an heirloom award, and the recognition may be reduced to a simple business transaction. Here's a breakout of anticipated annual spending per employee: Every seven business days or thirty five times a year you will thank with something free - a handwritten note, verbal praise, or an email of thanks, for example.

Four to six times a year on average, you will award with something of tangible but often de minimis value - a gift from a selection, movie tickets, a basket of food, or dinner or coffee certificates, for example.

On average at least every two years, an employee should receive a tangible performance award for above-and-beyond behavior. Of course, there are many outstanding employees in your organization who will receive several performance awards annually. At least semiannually, you should be celebrating team victories with a gift, party, or outing. At ninety days, one year, three years, five years, seven years, ten years, and then every five years thereafter, it's important to recognize loyalty with a lasting award appropriate to their achievement.

Awards With money to spend and an idea of the behaviors to recognize, it's time to begin handing out praise and recognition awards. To keep things fresh, you'll probably need some idea of what to give and a few good ways to remember to recognize. Fortunately, we've got a few ideas for you: Goal Setting 1 On a new employee's first day, set expectations high by planning a small celebration. Then send out an email to employees about the new person and why she was chosen to join the team.

Invite coworkers to stop by. Even better, present the new person with a card signed by everyone on the team, welcoming her aboard. Why not ask? Ask each employee to list the values that guide his or her daily decisions. During a private meeting, discuss how these lists compare with and contrast to the company mission and value statements. Set the example. Put a note on your bathroom mirror to see before you leave for work. Tape it inside your checkbook. Move the notes frequently so they are always unexpected.

Remember that what is out of sight is out of mind. Just because an employee doesn't blow his horn doesn't mean he wouldn't like you to make some noise. Ask an employee to help train a new employee in a job function where the employee excels. Explain in detail what qualifies the employee for this important assignment. If you don't believe your team can achieve a goal, it's almost certain they won't.

Pay for the spouse's airplane ticket and extend the trip by one day for some sightseeing. Make it even better by inviting their families to join them for lunch. Choose a flick that won't offend anyone, and, if possible, double the impact by choosing a movie that shows a team working together to achieve a difficult goal.

Give employees important tasks that stretch their abilities and are outside their job descriptions. Give them the training, resources, and contacts they require to succeed. At the beginning of each day, put three coins in your right pocket. Transfer one to the left each time you reward an employee for a behavior that is critical to your goals, customers, employees, and company. Very inspiring. Apr 09, Paul rated it really liked it Shelves: Will be a book I recommend to struggling leaders.

Key excerpts below: It is far and away the most significant uncalculated expense in corporate America. May 01, Kevin Hanks rated it it was amazing Recommended to Kevin by: I gave this book 5 stars because of the first several chapters. There it describes the underlying principle of the entire book: It was brilliantly written, and I think if more people lived those principles, the world especially the professional world would be a much better place. The authors started to lose me towards the end of the book, when they went into the application I gave this book 5 stars because of the first several chapters.

The authors started to lose me towards the end of the book, when they went into the application of those principles, and suggested behaviors. They created what was to me a very elaborate and confusing protocols for determining how valuable a reward should be and what kind of gift to give the person Many of the suggestions involve the giving of elaborate gifts and trinkets conveniently provided by the company that sponsored the research and the book , which I thought complicated the otherwise simple concept of praising desired action.

When it comes to recognition, I almost feel like it's so rare, most people could start with simply saying "thank you", and there would be a dramatic increase in results. The elaborate gifts could be useful, but only after the basic idea of rewarding good behavior has become of habit. That being said however, I think the principles were spot on, and I hope I can be the type of leader that embraces this concept.

I already wrote out two "thank you" emails to friends this afternoon. View 1 comment.

This book does an outstanding job of explaining the problem faced by all managers - how to have happy, satisfied, engaged employees who give their all and contribute to the organization's success - and offering the solution. Done properly and with the right foundation in place, recognition is what has the biggest impact on the employees. This book explains why, using data and anecdotes from research, without feeling dry or technical. Then it goes further, providing specific and prac This book does an outstanding job of explaining the problem faced by all managers - how to have happy, satisfied, engaged employees who give their all and contribute to the organization's success - and offering the solution.

Then it goes further, providing specific and practical guidance on how to implement recognition. It is a pretty quick read, with useful information on every page. Nov 20, Mariya rated it really liked it. This business advice sounds like some parenting advice that I received years ago--Focus on the positive and ignore the negative. Reward the behavior that you want to have repeated. It works with kids, so it should work with adults.

(ebook) Summary: The Carrot Principle

I like this book a lot! Dec 28, Gene Babon rated it it was amazing Shelves: Nearly four out of five employees who quit their jobs cite a lack of recognition as a key reason for leaving. If you are a business leader, or aspire to become one, this book offers practical guidance on how to effectively lead your workforce.

Here are the two things your workers want most: In a competitive business environment this leads to an underperforming b Nearly four out of five employees who quit their jobs cite a lack of recognition as a key reason for leaving. In a competitive business environment this leads to an underperforming business. The Carrot Principle details the Basic Four areas of business leadership: If you are looking for an action plan to energize the team you lead, this book is a keeper and should be referred to daily.

Mar 01, Michael Loveless rated it really liked it. The Carrot Principle is an excellent book for managers and a helpful book for anyone who is a leader in any sense teacher, coach, parent, etc. Adrian Gostick and Chester Elton argue that competent managers can use recognition as an accelerator that helps spur people on to a greater quality and quantity of work.

They makes a strong case, using various studies to prove their point. The best thing about the book is how specific it is about the use of recognition. The authors tell the qualities of The Carrot Principle is an excellent book for managers and a helpful book for anyone who is a leader in any sense teacher, coach, parent, etc. The authors tell the qualities of effective recognition timely, specific, etc. They identify the frequency once a week and the key milestones starting at one month when formal recognition should begin.

They describe four levels of contribution that an employee might make to the company and the dollar amounts that are appropriate for each level.

They mention common mistakes made by bosses who attempt recognition for example, never say, "That was good, but The book is thought-provoking and very practical. Aug 04, Merrick rated it it was amazing. This second addition, through additional data provided by Towers Watson, provides even more proof that feedback and recognition are powerful tools for engaging employees and achieving higher levels of productivity.

From my work as a management consultant, it is clear that managers do not recognize and reward people as much as they should. The Carrot Principle shines a light on the principle that people exhibit behaviors that they are rewarded to exhibit.

And once this insight is illuminated, as Gostick and Elton so eloquently demonstrate through data and case studies, readers will have bridged the gap between something they know I need to provide feedback and something they do I must give feedback.

The Carrot Principle should inspire everyone to go out and seek people doing things right…then tell them! Great premise, proof and application. Recognition is the 'relationship bridge' between management and talent that seeks to achieve pg 68 2. Building Blocks of Recognition: Day-to-day, Above-and-beyond, careeer and celebration recognition. Predictors of Engagement: Power of Recognition is global; must improve 2-way comm; use corp symbol in recognition pg 6.

The Carrot Principle

Dec 10, John Graham rated it liked it. This book provided some great points and thought provoking ideas. While I'd recommend it to anyone looking to up their engagement level through recognition, I can't say I enjoyed every chapter. With any business related book now, it seems that the first few chapters are spent explaining the data and why you need what the book is talking about. I've never enjoyed those chapters because if I'm reading the book, I obviously already want the information so I don't need to be "sold" on it.

So skip the This book provided some great points and thought provoking ideas. So skip the first chapters and get to the meat of it. Aug 05, Shaun rated it really liked it. This was an interesting book regarding recognition in the work place. I was an interesting take on the little expense it is to recognize your employees and how far that recognition goes to help improve a business.

An insightful, interesting read. Recognition isn't hard, but it's not a normal human habit either. I recommend anyone read this book who manages employees or is in charge of a team or class. Jan 12, Brian rated it it was amazing Shelves: I gave this book five stars because it provides the data to back up everything heard on Manager Tools related to one-on-ones, feedback, delegation and coaching. Someday after I have a year of blow out results I plan to pull out this book and use the numbers in here to put together my 'how I killed it' presentation.

Apr 16, Charmin rated it really liked it Shelves: Career dev of Individual in connection to company goals. Noble purpose. Accountability 4. Trust 5. VIP — employee appreciation, value impact personalization. Jul 23, Angel rated it really liked it Shelves: Another one I picked up at the public library.

It was in the New Books area, and the title sounded catchy, so I picked it up. Definitely a book more managers should be reading and acting upon. Here is the note I made about it on my personal blog: Jan 21, Nick rated it it was amazing. This genial book tells us that we should recognize our employees to bring out the best in them, and increase the productivity of our companies.

That's not surprising, but what is important about this book is that it proves what we instinctively know to be true. Lots of research and examples reinforce the basic idea that people should be nice to each other to succeed.

Sep 27, Kim Brown rated it it was amazing. Probably the most actionable book on leadership I have read. Cant wait to start practicing the Carrot Principle! May 12, Tyler Dick rated it liked it. I read it specifically for my Rewards and Recognition project at work. For that initiative, it was useful for some of the nuts and bolts of what I was working on.

For the average reader, I would say it's probably not a great read. Feb 16, Kathy Saunders rated it liked it. Same thing over and over. Good ideas though. Jun 27, Alina rated it liked it. Good book describing, how important for people to be recognised for their everyday work. Good summary on the importance of knowing how to motivate staff, and specifically why recognition and award are often better than pay. They tout recognition as the accelerator for business, basing their Carrot Principle on a 10 year study of , managers and employees.

Recognition, they argue, needs to be Frequent, Specific and Timely. Bosses can recognize as Altruists the right thing to do or Expectors now you owe me , and the difference in results can be startling.

Make sure your recognition program is: - Strategic: Aligned with your core values and goals - Simple: Easy to use and understand - Measured: Providing a return on your investment - Owned: By your managers and senior leaders Level: What level of award is appropriate for what behavior? Spending: How much should you budget for recognition? Awards: What creative rewards can you offer for excellent performance?

Levels 1 Thank-you: Small step toward living your values 2 Bronze: One-time above-and-beyond action, linked to your values, which makes you more successful 3 Silver: Ongoing above-and-beyond demonstration of your values in action, which is making your organization more successful 4 Gold: Action, project, or behavior that has a significant impact on the bottom line 1 Thank you recognition is for daily, ongoing encouragement of the small steps that lead us to success.

After all, it's rarely the large things that differentiate us in our customers' minds from the competition; it's the little things employees do that make all the difference. Thank-you recognition is the most frequent type offered by effective managers. It is given to an employee who meets but not necessarily exceeds performance expectations.

It is day-to-day encouragement for the person who is a consistent and steady performer, who always gets the report in on time, who is always courteous when making a deliver to a customer's home or business, who always has a positive attitude, who is the consummate team player, who gave an admirable try but didn't quite make it, and so on.

This could include the presentation of a personalized award, dinner for two, tickets to a ball game or symphony, a selection from a catalogue of merchandise, or anything else you can dream up. Employees are eligible for these awards if they consistently demonstrate your values by taking on challenging customer issues, work late weeks in a row, develop sophisticated changes to improve important processes, demonstrate outstanding leadership, improve the way you pitch prospective clients, mentor a new employee to productivity, provide exceptional customer care, and so on.

If you know that at PM, after closing, Susan doesn't hesitate in opening the doors when a frantic customer shows up, she's worthy of a silver award.

These may be one-time or ongoing achievements and are the highest level of above-and-beyond awards. These rewards recognize an employee who has clearly influenced your financial statement, perhaps by developing a new system that saves money, being granted a patent, winning an important industry award, breaking a performance record, landing a new account, introducing a new process to significantly improve efficiency, achieving a top sales goal, being part of a team that came together with the innovative pitch that won a big deal, or working from a customer service position to keep a big client in the fold.

The level of award will depend on the impact. If the idea saves millions of dollars, they the sky is the limit when it comes to how much you will spend to recognize this person or team. Neglect to present an heirloom award, and the recognition may be reduced to a simple business transaction.

Every seven business days or thirty five times a year you will thank with something free - a handwritten note, verbal praise, or an email of thanks, for example. Four to six times a year on average, you will award with something of tangible but often de minimis value - a gift from a selection, movie tickets, a basket of food, or dinner or coffee certificates, for example.

On average at least every two years, an employee should receive a tangible performance award for above-and-beyond behavior. Of course, there are many outstanding employees in your organization who will receive several performance awards annually. At least semiannually, you should be celebrating team victories with a gift, party, or outing.

At ninety days, one year, three years, five years, seven years, ten years, and then every five years thereafter, it's important to recognize loyalty with a lasting award appropriate to their achievement.

Awards With money to spend and an idea of the behaviors to recognize, it's time to begin handing out praise and recognition awards. To keep things fresh, you'll probably need some idea of what to give and a few good ways to remember to recognize. Fortunately, we've got a few ideas for you: to be exact.

Dymocks - (ebook) Summary: The Carrot Principle, eBook ()

Goal Setting 1 On a new employee's first day, set expectations high by planning a small celebration. Then send out an email to employees about the new person and why she was chosen to join the team. Invite coworkers to stop by. Even better, present the new person with a card signed by everyone on the team, welcoming her aboard.

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Why not ask? Ask each employee to list the values that guide his or her daily decisions. During a private meeting, discuss how these lists compare with and contrast to the company mission and value statements.

Set the example. Put a note on your bathroom mirror to see before you leave for work.

Tape it inside your checkbook. Move the notes frequently so they are always unexpected. Remember that what is out of sight is out of mind. Just because an employee doesn't blow his horn doesn't mean he wouldn't like you to make some noise.

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Ask an employee to help train a new employee in a job function where the employee excels. Explain in detail what qualifies the employee for this important assignment. If you don't believe your team can achieve a goal, it's almost certain they won't.

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