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The Da Vinci Code: Featuring Robert Langdon (Robert Langdon series) by Dan Brown. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. Excellent book. The Da Vinci Code: (Robert Langdon Book 2). Robert Langdon (part: 2). by Dan Brown. Clear Rating. (/5) Recommended Titles. EPUB. The Da Vinci Code Dan Brown - Robert Langdon #2 (EPUB) Ebook Download. An ingenious code hidden in the works of Leonardo da Vinci. A desperate race.

The elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum, his body covered in baffling symbols. As Langdon and gifted French cryptologist Sophie Neveu sort through the bizarre riddles, they are stunned to discover a trail of clues hidden in the works of Leonardo da Vinci—clues visible for all to see and yet ingeniously disguised by the painter. Even more startling, the late curator was involved in the Priory of Sion—a secret society whose members included Sir Isaac Newton, Victor Hugo, and Da Vinci—and he guarded a breathtaking historical secret. Unless Langdon and Neveu can decipher the labyrinthine puzzle—while avoiding the faceless adversary who shadows their every move—the explosive, ancient truth will be lost forever. About The Da Vinci Code While in Paris on business, Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: the elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum. Near the body, police have found a baffling cipher. While working to solve the enigmatic riddle, Langdon is stunned to discover it leads to a trail of clues hidden in the works of Da Vinci — clues visible for all to see — yet ingeniously disguised by the painter. Langdon joins forces with a gifted French cryptologist, Sophie Neveu, and learns the late curator was involved in the Priory of Sion — an actual secret society whose members included Sir Isaac Newton, Botticelli, Victor Hugo, and Da Vinci, among others. In a breathless race through Paris, London, and beyond, Langdon and Neveu match wits with a faceless powerbroker who seems to anticipate their every move.

The New York Times writer Laura Miller characterized the novel as "based on a notorious hoax", "rank nonsense", and "bogus", saying the book is heavily based on the fabrications of Pierre Plantard , who is asserted to have created the Priory of Sion in Critics accuse Brown of distorting and fabricating history.

For example, Marcia Ford wrote: Regardless of whether you agree with Brown's conclusions, it's clear that his history is largely fanciful, which means he and his publisher have violated a long-held if unspoken agreement with the reader: Fiction that purports to present historical facts should be researched as carefully as a nonfiction book would be. This assertion is broadly disputed; the Priory of Sion is generally regarded as a hoax created in by Pierre Plantard.

The author also claims that "all descriptions of artwork, architecture, documents… and secret rituals in this novel are accurate", but this claim is disputed by numerous academic scholars expert in numerous areas.

The Da Vinci Code

Brown also says, "It is my belief that some of the theories discussed by these characters may have merit" and "the secret behind The Da Vinci Code was too well documented and significant for me to dismiss. He replied "Absolutely all of it.

Asked by Elizabeth Vargas in an ABC News special if the book would have been different if he had written it as non-fiction he replied, "I don't think it would have. The program featured lengthy interviews with many of the main protagonists cited by Brown as "absolute fact" in The Da Vinci Code. The earliest appearance of this theory is due to the 13th-century Cistercian monk and chronicler Peter of Vaux de Cernay who reported that Cathars believed that the 'evil' and 'earthly' Jesus Christ had a relationship with Mary Magdalene , described as his concubine and that the 'good Christ' was incorporeal and existed spiritually in the body of Paul.

The Da Vinci Code: (Robert Langdon Book 2)

The novel's argument is as follows: [9] Constantine wanted Christianity to act as a unifying religion for the Roman Empire. He thought Christianity would appeal to pagans only if it featured a demigod similar to pagan heroes. According to the Gnostic Gospels , Jesus was merely a human prophet, not a demigod. Therefore, to change Jesus' image, Constantine destroyed the Gnostic Gospels and promoted the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, which portray Jesus as divine or semi-divine.

But Gnosticism did not portray Jesus as merely human. Its writing and historical accuracy were reviewed negatively by The New Yorker , [12] Salon.

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown

That word is wow. The author is Dan Brown a name you will want to remember.

In this gleefully erudite suspense novel, Mr. Brown takes the format he has been developing through three earlier novels and fine-tunes it to blockbuster perfection. Still, Brown has assembled a whopper of a plot that will please both conspiracy buffs and thriller addicts.

Helen Fielding spotted that young unmarrieds were a social grouping without a literature; Allison Pearson noticed the same gap for working mums. And coming up to two years after September 11, — roughly the time it takes conventional fiction publishing to respond to cultural shifts — what did we find unstoppably atop the American fiction charts?

When bad things happen, Brown reassures us, it is probably because of the machinations of a 1,year-old secret society which is quietly running the world, though often in conflict with another hidden organisation.

What happens in The Da Vinci Code is … alert readers will have noticed a delay in getting round to plot summary, but it takes time to force the face straight. Art expert Jacques Sauniere is discovered murdered in the Louvre, having somehow found the strength in his last haemorrhaging moments to arrange his body in the shape of a famous artwork and leave a series of codes around the building.

As they joust with authorial research — about the divine proportion in nature and the possibility that the Mona Lisa is a painting of Leonardo himself in drag — a thug from the secretive Catholic organisation Opus Dei, under orders from a sinister bishop, is also trying to understand the meaning of the imaginative corpse in the museum.

It all seems to be connected with the Priory of Sion, a secret society.

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Reading a book of this kind is rather like going to the doctor for the results of tests. You desperately want to know the outcome but have a sickening feeling about what it might prove to be.

Recently, crime and thriller fiction has been increasingly easy to defend against literary snobs at the level of the sentence.

Not here. The author has, though, recently found himself on the end of an unwanted conspiracy theory: another writer has accused him of plagiarism.

This admission of unoriginality may further anger readers and writers annoyed by seeing something as preposterous and sloppy one terrible howler involves the European passport system as The Da Vinci Code on its way to selling millions.

Breaking the Da Vinci Code (Video ) - IMDb

It tells so many Americans what they want to hear: that everything is meant. In doing so, Brown has cracked the bestseller code. He is a graduate of Amherst College and Phillips Exeter Academy, where he spent time as an English teacher before turning his efforts fully to writing.